Easy Homemade Rolls for Holiday Dinners

Easy Homemade Rolls

This week I baked some very easy homemade rolls. Our holiday dinners wouldn’t feel complete without fresh baked bread, and it’s one of the additions to the table that I love to contribute. When my family gathers, I love to spoil them with the foods they remember from growing up. It’s how I show them how much they mean to me. 

And I don’t mean that to say you have to slave away in the kitchen in order to prepare a holiday meal! Not at all. There are many foods that can be prepared from scratch without a huge time investment. Easy Homemade rolls might sound like a long ordeal but trust me, it should’t be. 

Breaking Bread

Bread is a traditional part of most meals. Historically, bread in some form, has been a part of human diets for many thousands of years. Rich and poor alike consumed bread, although in different forms. White bread was available only to the rich and royals until modern times. Wheat is the most common grain used to bake bread. Wheat contains carbohydrates, protein and important B vitamins.

Fresh baked breads and rolls are comforting too, and make a great gift.

So it’s no surprise that most of us look forward to the aroma of fresh baked bread and rolls on our dinner tables. Thanksgiving is a time to bring out our best recipes. We break bread together and enjoy it as an appetizer or a accompaniment to a delicious dinner. 

Lets Get Started

 The recipe for easy homemade rolls is one that I have adapted from a recipe for sandwich rolls in an old cookbook. 

I make the rolls a smaller size for dinner parties, but you can make them large or small and adjust the baking time accordingly. The Easy Homemade Roll bakes in about half the time that a sandwich size roll requires. Be careful not to over bake. The small size of a dinner roll means it can dry out quickly.

Easy Homemade Rolls

Keep scrolling for a printable recipe card version, later in the post.

easy homemade rolls

Ingredients

  1. water – 1 cup luke warm water divided
  2. butter- 2 Tbsp melted
  3. sugar- 2 Tbsp
  4. salt- 2 tsp
  5. bread flour – 3 to 3 and 1/4 cups
  6. nonfat dry milk – 3 Tbsp
  7. yeast – 2 tsp or 1 package

roll dough

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, mix the yeast with 1/4 cup of warm water.
  2. Let the yeast sit in the water for 10 minutes
  3. add two cups of flour, the sugar, nonfat dry milk, melted butter, and salt.
  4. Using a sturdy spoon or a stand mixer begin mixing the dough.
  5. Gradually add the remainder of the warm water.
  6. add the remaining cup or cup and a quarter of flour until the batter begins to form a dough ball.

Kneading is Fundamental

  1. If kneading by hand, remove the dough from the bowl and begin to knead the dough forward and then backward in a kneading motion until the dough is firm and elastic. It should spring back when pushed on with a finger. ( if using a stand mixer with a dough hook, your mixer will do the kneading for you.)
  2. Put the dough back in the bowl, cover with a towel and put in a warm, draft free spot for about one hour. The dough will rise and double in size.

  1. After the dough has risen, punch it down, knead a couple of times and reform into a ball. Let rest on a cutting board, covered with a towel for 20 minutes.
  2. Cut the dough into 24 equal pieces. Form the pieces into balls and place on parchment paper on a cookie sheet. Cover with a towel again and let rise for one hour.

Punch the Dough!

Time to Bake

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Optional – Beat one egg. Brush the tops of each roll with a light egg coating. Sprinkle sesame seeds, poppy seeds, onion flakes if desired.
  3. Bake for 10 minutes
  4. Let cool for 1 minute. Serve warm with butter.
  5. The rolls can be make ahead of time and frozen in freezer bags for later use. Defrost rolls when ready to use. Reheat in a low oven for 2 to 3 minutes to warm.

NOTES

  1. Variations: Make sandwich rolls by dividing the original dough ball into 12 pieces. Continue as above. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes. or until golden brown.

Adapted from an old cookbook for bread machines.

 

Heavenly Rolls
Yields 24
Dinner rolls
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Prep Time
2 hr 45 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
3 hr
Prep Time
2 hr 45 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
3 hr
Ingredients
  1. water - 1 cup luke warm water divided
  2. butter- 2 Tbsp melted
  3. sugar- 2 Tbsp
  4. salt- 2 tsp
  5. bread flour - 3 to 3 and 1/4 cups
  6. nonfat dry milk - 3 Tbsp
  7. yeast - 2 tsp or 1 package
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, mix the yeast with 1/4 cup of warm water.
  2. Let the yeast sit in the water for 10 minutes
  3. add two cups of flour, the sugar, nonfat dry milk, melted butter, and salt.
  4. Using a sturdy spoon or a stand mixer begin mixing the dough.
  5. Gradually add the remainder of the warm water.
  6. add the remaining cup or cup and a quarter of flour until the batter begins to form a dough ball.
  7. If kneading by hand, remove the dough from the bowl and begin to knead the dough forward and then backward in a kneading motion until the dough is firm and elastic. It should spring back when pushed on with a finger. ( if using a stand mixer with a dough hook, your mixer will do the kneading for you.)
  8. Put the dough back in the bowl, cover with a towel and put in a warm, draft free spot for about one hour. The dough will rise and double in size.
  9. After the dough has risen, punch it down, knead a couple of times and reform into a ball. Let rest on a cutting board, covered with a towel for 20 minutes.
  10. Cut the dough into 24 equal pieces. Form the pieces into balls and place on parchment paper on a cookie sheet. Cover with a towel again and let rise for one hour.
  11. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  12. Optional - Beat one egg. Brush the tops of each roll with a light egg coating. Sprinkle sesame seeds, poppy seeds, onion flakes if desired.
  13. Bake for 10 minutes
  14. Let cool for 1 minute. Serve warm with butter.
  15. The rolls can be make ahead of time and frozen in freezer bags for later use. Defrost rolls when ready to use. Reheat in a low oven for 2 to 3 minutes to warm.
Notes
  1. Variations: Make sandwich rolls by dividing the original dough ball into 12 pieces. Continue as above. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes. or until golden brown.
Adapted from an old cookbook for bread machines.
Adapted from an old cookbook for bread machines.
Timber Creek Farm https://timbercreekfarmer.com/

 

DSC_4275

Easy homemade rolls

“Good bread is the most fundamentally satisfying of all foods; and good bread with fresh butter, the greatest of feasts.”
 James Beard
 




Baked Venison Meatballs- For Quick Meals

venison meatballs

I am all about quick dinner ideas these days, but I’m even more about healthy homemade meals. Often it seems the two of those do not go hand in hand. However, these venison meatballs were actually quick to put together. I’m lucky to have a husband who loves to hunt so we have a freezer full of venison. If you aren’t as lucky, you can substitute ground beef and it will still be a delicious recipe! We had these meatballs with homemade sweet potato fries, but they would be great with spaghetti or as meatball subs, too!

Baked Venison Meatballs

Prep time: 15 minutes Bake time: 30 minutes
Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Ingredients:
1 pound ground venison
2 eggs
1 cup Panko or bread crumbs
1 tsp garlic powder or 1-2 clove garlic (minced)
2 tablespoons Italian seasoning
Optional: 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese

Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl, mix well. Roll ground venison mixture into approx. 1 inch balls and place on a baking sheet. Bake in oven at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes. You can roll them halfway through if you don?t want the bottoms to get too flat). Yields approx. 20-25 meatballs. To freeze leftovers, arrange on a wax paper lined cookie sheet and place in the freezer, once they are frozen you can transfer them to a freezer bag.

baked venison meatballs

This can be a tasty make ahead meal to pull out of the freezer for those days when cooking just isn’t going to happen. Add a green salad, crusty rolls and enjoy!

baked venison meatballs

From Baked Venison Meatballs to Gluten Free Meatballs – The possibilities are endless!

There are probably as many ways to serve meatballs as you can dream up. Ask a group of blogging friends for their favorite ways to serve meatballs and stand back! Whether you are using venison baked meatballs, or another recipe for meatballs, the choices are endless. Take a look at these delicious ideas.

Cocktail Meatballs in Cherry BBQ Sauce

Orange-Pineapple Sweet and Sour Meatballs

Homemade Buffalo Bleu Meatballs

Seriously I bet you have to go see what a Drunk Moose Meatball is. Go. do it.

Easy Gluten-free Meatballs with Vegetables and Herbs

I think that the key to a great meatball is not only the meat and seasonings, but the delicious sauce. Teriyaki, barbecue, sweet and sour sauce, cheese sauce, and the ever popular Italian style spaghetti sauce. Personally, my favorite is teriyaki, followed by barbecue.

This recipe is a must try on my list. Learning and Yearning shared her family’s much loved homemade tomato sauce with beef bones. For a little different approach, try Susan’s Roasted Tomato Sauce.

venison meatballs
photo credit Jason Leung – Unsplash.com

What types of meals do you turn to for quick and easy dinner time recipes? Please feel free to share with me in the comments section! Lets share our best ideas. After all, we all need to eat!

venison meatballs

If you enjoyed this post you might like: Meatloaf Recipe in the SunOven

And from Game and GardenDuck Meatballs




Cooking Peaches, Preserved, Baked and Delicious

Cooking Peaches- The Ultimate Summer Fruit

Peaches preserved baked delicious

Summer fruit brings to mind tomatoes, nectarines, plums, peaches and more. My favorite remains peaches. For sweetness and aroma cooking peaches can’t be beat. Preserving this summer goodness is easy. While you’re at it, save enough to enjoy now with ice cream, fruit toppings, fresh fruit salsa and in baked goods.

Start with fresh ripe peaches with little to no overly ripe soft spots. Choose for the delicious aroma, also. Whether you grow your own or buy from the local farmer’s market, harvesting and buying and cooking peaches, at the peak of the season will give you the best taste and texture.

Peaches

 

Preparing Peaches for Canning or Freezing

Soft fruits, such as peaches, tomatoes and nectarines are easy to prepare for canning or freezing. Once the fruit has been quickly blanched in a simmering pot of water,then, removed to a pot of ice cold water, the skin slips right off. The peach often practically splits open for easy removal of the pit. The peach halves can be canned as is, in a simple syrup or plain water. Or, you can slice, dice or chunk the peaches. Add a tablespoon or two of lemon juice or citric acid, to keep the fruit from browning. Mix to distribute the lemon juice throughout the fruit.

cooking peaches

At this point, you can place the peaches into freezer bags or into canning jars. I use a slotted spoon so I don’t get a lot of liquid in with the peaches I am freezing. Freezing is easy but has a shorter shelf life than canning due to possible freezer burn. I use a sturdy zip lock style freezer bag, removing as much air as possible. I flatten out the peaches into a single layer in the bag, which makes it easier to stack the bags in the freezer. When ready to enjoy, thaw the peaches in the bag in a refrigerator. 

Using the Skins

(note: if you have farm animals or chickens that you like to treat to your kitchen scraps, be aware that pits and seeds can be toxic. I do not feed peach pits to my farm animals for this reason. The skin however, is a welcome tasty treat)

Canning Peaches to Enjoy Later

Fill the jars with the cut up or sliced peaches. Add the peach juice and boiling water to fill the jar within a half inch of the top of the jar. Wipe off the rim of the jar with a clean wet cloth. Add the flat lid and the band to close the jar.

Process canned peaches for 25 minutes for pints and 30 minutes for quarts in boiling water in the Water Bath Canner.   Look for other recipes such as brandied fruits, peach jam and jelly and peach pie filling to use your peaches with, also. Since peaches are a high acid fruit,(pH under 4.5)  you will can most peach recipes using a hot water bath canner.

Other High Acid Fruits

Apples, peaches, tomatoes, nectarines, citrus fruits, pears and berries fall into the category of high acid fruits. It is important to use an approved canning recipe when using a hot water bath canner, because the acidity must be in a certain range. If you add non-acidic ingredients to the peaches, the total acidity will be lower, making it unsafe to can using a water bath canner.

peaches preserved baked and delicious

Dehydrating/Drying Peaches for Storing

Peeled peaches can also be dried or dehydrated for long term storage. I use an electric dehydrator,  but you an also use a sun oven for the same purpose. Store your dehydrated peaches in an air tight container or mason jar with a tight fitting lid. Use the dehydrated peaches in trail mix, and bake into cakes, or eat plain.

Eat Fresh!

While you have the abundance of good fresh peaches in front of you, don’t forget the obvious opportunity to enjoy them fresh. Serve peeled sliced peaches with ice cream, cereal, plain, and keep a few on hand for lunch boxes. We prefer our peaches cold from the refrigerator but they can sit in a bowl on your counter or table, taking a turn at being a summer decoration, too. Grab one as you run out the door, for a healthy snack. Cooking fresh peaches into a thick topping is delicious when added to homemade vanilla ice cream!

peaches preserved baked delicous

Baking with Peaches

As you can imagine, cooking peaches is amazing when baked. This will be a delicious way to enjoy the harvest. Peaches taste and smell like summer. The cakes, pies, crumbles, cobblers, quick breads and triffles you make with your fresh peaches will prolong the taste of summer. Preserving the peaches from the season gives you the chance to enjoy peach pie and peach cake for any occasion, all year long.

The Recipe

When I was on an extended stay in Georgia one summer, when my little Georgia Peach granddaughter was born, I really enjoyed baking for her family. I came up with a peach cobbler recipe one day, by melding together a few different recipes from the internet search. Some weren’t quite what I was looking for and some were just full of ingredients that we didn’t have on hand. I came up with an experimental cobbler that turned out to be very popular! After all, isn’t this what Grammas do? One trick I learned while developing the cobbler recipe was to precook the filling for a set time, and then add the top crust batter. This resulted in a more crispy and less soggy crust on the cobbler. It also kept the crust from over cooking.

cooking peaches

Georgia Peach Cobbler

Peaches preserved baked and delicious

for printable version of this recipe click here

FOR THE PEACHES

  1. 10 – 14 peaches, peeled, pit removed and sliced
  2. 2 teaspoons citric acid or 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  3. 1/4 cup white sugar (generously full)
  4. quarter cup packed brown sugar
  5. 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  6. 1 tablespoon all purpose flour

FOR THE CAKE TOPPING

  1. 1 and 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  2. 1/4 cup white sugar (generously full)
  3.  packed brown sugar -1/4 cup
  4. 1 and 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  5. 3/4 teaspoons salt
  6. 1/2 cup chilled butter cut into small pieces
  7. 1/4 cup boiling water

FOR THE TOPPING

  1. sugar – 1/4 cup
  2. 1 and 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  3. 1/8 teaspoons nutmeg (optional)
 

PREHEAT OVEN TO 425 F.

  1. Using a large bowl mix the peach slices and the citric acid together.
  2. Add the sugars, cinnamon, and flour.
  3. Stir to evenly coat the peaches.
  4. Pour the peaches into greased 2 quart baking dish or 7 x 9 baking pan.

BAKE FOR 10 MINUTES

 

FOR THE CAKE TOPPING

  1. combine flour, both sugars and baking powder and salt
  2. mix in the butter with a pastry blender or two forks.
  3. continue to mix until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs
  4. add the boiling water and mix until just combined
  5.  Remove the peaches from the oven and drop the cake topping in spoonfuls all over the top of the peaches.
  6. Sprinkle the cinnamon, sugar and nutmeg mixture over the whole dish
     
     
    BAKE UNTIL TOPPING IS GOLDEN BROWN ABOUT 30 MINUTES
    1. cool 10 minutes in pan
    2. serve warm

 

More about Peaches!

Peach Butter – Attainable Sustainable

Peeling, Canning and Drying Peaches – Common Sense Homesteading

Spiced Brandied Peaches – Homespun Seasonal Living

Peach Jam Two Ways – Common Sense Homesteading

Georgia Peach Cobbler – Timber Creek Farm

 

September is National Organic Harvest Month and to help you make the most of your harvests, In 2015 I teamed up with these other amazing bloggers. Please be sure to check out their tips and more: Rachel from Grow a Good Life – Kathie from Homespun Seasonal Living – Teri from Homestead Honey – Chris from Joybilee Farm – Susan from Learning and Yearning – Shelle from Preparedness Mama – Angi from SchneiderPeeps – Janet from Timber Creek Farm

 

 

 

Peaches, Preserved, Baked, Delicious

 

 




Pickle Relish Recipes (Try it with Zucchini!)

pickle relish

This season, while canning pickles, I decided I wanted to make and can sweet pickle relish. I wanted to make a relish that would taste like the grocery store variety. I know that may sound odd but I really love the taste. When I need canning advice, I often turn to Sharon Peterson and her website, Simply Canning. When I realized that Sharon had published a canning cookbook, I had to purchase it.

I began checking into my canning books and asking friends for recipes, but all of the recipes had many more ingredients than I wanted to deal with in making my relish. And then I saw the recipe in my Simply Canning Cookbook. It seemed to be just what I was looking for. Since this book was a recent purchase, I had not thought to look here first, but I won’t make the same mistake again! The recipes are simple and straight forward, combined with a wealth of canning know how and experience. I like the way Sharon wrote the book as it is much the same format I  have used in teaching canning classes. 

Pickle relish cooking

 Anyway, back to the “perfect” sweet relish recipe. I was a little surprised at how much onion and green pepper were in the recipe because I don’t taste it. Almost every recipe had these ingredients, so I decided to include the onion and peppers. And, Sharon’s  recipe had a more reasonable amount for my taste. 

My Happy Results

I made a batch and was very happy with the taste. It was exactly what I was looking for. I wrote to Sharon and asked permission to share her recipe with you all, and she readily agreed. If you are looking for a great guide for canning, I highly recommend that you purchase Simply Canning, by Sharon Peterson.     It is available on Amazon by clicking this link. Not only is this book a complete guide to the mechanics of canning, the recipes are very good, too.

Here’s the recipe for you.

Sweet Pickle Relish
Yields 6
The perfect relish for hot dogs or hamburgers!
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Ingredients
  1. 1 quart of chopped cucumbers
  2. 2 cups of chopped onions
  3. 1 cup chopped green peppers
  4. 1 cup chopped red pepper
  5. 1/4 cup canning salt
  6. 3 cups sugar
  7. 2 cups cider vinegar
  8. 1 Tbsp celery seed
  9. 1 Tbsp mustard seed
Instructions
  1. Begin by preparing your jars and heating the water in the canner. Combine chopped cucumbers, onion, and peppers in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and cover with cold water. Let stand for two hours. Drain well. Press out any excess water.
  2. Combine sugar, vinegar and spices in a pot. Bring to a boil and add the vegetables. Simmer 10 minutes Pack into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles, wipe jar rims and place lids on the jars. Process 10 minutes in a water bath canner or according to the directions for your altitude.
Adapted from Simply Canning
Adapted from Simply Canning
Timber Creek Farm https://timbercreekfarmer.com/
pickle relish

Recipe for Perfectly Sweet Pickle Relish

1 quart of chopped cucumbers
2 cups of chopped onions
1 cup chopped green peppers
1 cup chopped red pepper
1/4 cup canning salt
3 cups sugar
2 cups cider vinegar
1 Tbsp celery seed
1 Tbsp mustard seed

Canning the Sweet Pickle Relish

Begin by preparing your jars and heating the water in the canner. Combine chopped cucumbers, onion, and peppers in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and cover with cold water. Let stand for two hours. Drain well. Press out any excess water.
Combine sugar, vinegar and spices in a pot. Bring to a boil and add the vegetables. Simmer 10 minutes Pack into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles, wipe jar rims and place lids on the jars. Process 10 minutes in a water bath canner or according to the directions for your altitude.

Yields 6 pints 

pickle relish in jars 

Zucchini Relish

 While discussing relish with many of my friends and readers on social media, I learned that many of you are making relish using zucchini. 

Rachelle, who occasionally writes for Homestead Chronicles, shared her zucchini relish recipe with us, too.
ZUCCHINI RECIPE
10 cups diced zucchini
1 cup pickling salt
5 cups diced onions
1 cup diced celery
3 cups sweet green peppers 2 cups sweet red peppers Mix this all together very well,
if possible refrigerate over night. Drain well, rinse several times (I wash mine 3x’s) and after the final rinse,press out as much of the water as possible.
In a large sauce pan mix: 5 cups white vinegar 6 cups sugar 2 tsp. turmeric 1 Tbsp dry mustard 3 Tbsp. Celery seed 

Time to Process the Zucchini Relish

Bring to a boil and simmer 20 minutes. Mix chopped vegetables into this and bring to a simmer for 20 minutes I run this through a strainer saving the ‘juice’ and put the vegetables into the jars carefully. After the jars are filled with the proper half inch head space, Add the reserved juice so that the vegetables are covered in liquid, still leaving the head space. Clean your rims, add your lids and bands, finger tight. Process in  water bath canner for 20 minutes after returning to a boil. Once they have cooled (I let mine set over night) remove bands and clean top of jar,label and store. I wait 6 weeks before opening. Hot dogs, hamburgers, macaroni salad, potato salad. Any where you would use a sweet relish. A friend uses it with her beef roast. Hope you enjoy this recipe.

Are You Searching for Crunchy Pickle Tips?

On a slightly different and yet still cucumber note, have you been searching for the secret to crunchy pickles? Ann, from A Farm Girl in the Making teaches us all about pickle making and how to get the crunch in this article. Don’t miss it. And grab a copy of Ann’s recent book, A Farm Girl’s Guide to  Preserving the Harvest, (Lyon’s Press, 2019). Her book will inspire you to preserve more of your family’s food and enjoy the freshness all year long.

sweet pickle relish

Thanks Everyone who joined in the conversation! Let us know in the comments how you make your relish. And if you are looking to skip the exhaustion of canning season, don’t miss this post.

 

 

(this post was re-published in July of 2015 and again in 2019, after edits were completed. It may contain affiliate links)




APPLE PIE JAM

Apple Pie JamApple Pie Jam is a favorite for fall and winter. The jam is not too sweet but has lots of great taste! One of the benefits of having an abundance of a particular veggie or fruit is that you feel a bit more comfortable experimenting with recipes. Not meaning to sound wasteful but if I am staring at two bushels of apples that have been gifted to me by my generous son, I feel a bit of freedom to express myself with the abundance. So after making gallons of applesauce, jars of pie filling, in addition to apple butter and spiced apples, I decided to try a recipe for Apple Pie Jam. One thing I am not too keen on though is the huge amount of sugar needed to make most jam recipes. For this recipe, I decided to make many variations on what I was finding in almost all Apple Pie Jam instructions. Pssst. If your looking for a great apple pie and pie crust recipe, try this one.

 
 
 

Pulling out the supplies and ingredients I grabbed my enamel cast iron pot. It’s large, holds 6 quarts easily, so I could make a big batch of experimental Apple Pie Jam. Clean and sterilize 10  half pint or 5 pint jars and lids. I always prepare one or two extra jars just in case the recipe makes more. 

Apple Pie Jam

Directions for Making Apple Pie Jam

The first step is to wash  and peel the apples. I used about 25 apples but you need to just loosely fill the pan with cut up fruit. Add the lemon juice and bring the apples to a boil. Continue to simmer the fruit until it is soft and can be mashed. When the apples are soft enough to mash, remove the pan from the heat. I use a old fashioned potato masher to crush the fruit. You could lightly blend the fruit in a food processor or blender, but I don’t like to have another appliance to clean up later. I prefer the jam to be a little chunky but you can use your own preference on this.

Add the Spices

Add the cinnamon, and allspice to the apples. Stir in about 4 cups of granulated sugar. This is where my recipe differs greatly from most recipes I looked up. Most called for 7 to 8 cups of sugar. Basically the thought of adding that much sugar to fresh fruit makes my teeth hurt. I wanted to see if this was really needed in order to make jam. In addition, I changed the spice quantities, and spice ingredients so I feel that I can really claim this recipe as my own! Keep it simple, I always say.

Return the mashed fruit to the heat and bring to a boil. Boil hard for four or five minutes and then add one envelope of Certo Liquid Pectin. Boil hard for one minute longer and the jam should be thick enough to stop the cooking. Be careful not to boil too long as the mixture can turn to hard candy! (Don’t ask me how I know this. It involved picking fresh raspberries and my first attempt at making jam)

Pour into Jars

Pour the hot jam mixture into the sterilized jars. Wipe the rims and cap with the two part lid. Process in the hot water canner for 10 minutes for half pints and 15 minutes for pints.

I think this recipe tastes very much like old fashioned apple butter. But it takes a lot less time to make! We have enjoyed it on toast, waffles and pancakes. I plan to make gifts this year including a jar of  Apple Pie Jam and a package of Pancake Mix. It’s a yummy change from maple syrup.

Enjoy!

Apple Pie Jam
 
8 – 10 cups of cut up apples 
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp allspice
4 cups of  granulated sugar
1 envelope Certo brand Liquid Pectin
canning jars
 

BUT WAIT! There’s More!

Still looking for ways to preserve apples? How about Apple Chips! Or Learn how to make Apple Cider Vinegar.

Still more? Hawthorne Apple Cider looks delicious! 

For a non-food alternative that makes a great fall hostess gift, make up a batch of Apple Cider Soap!